Starspeeder Space Hangar on Flickr.Tomorrowland
Tokyo Disneyland
This week: The Tokyo of Tomorrow(land)
As I’ve mentioned before, Star Tours is a big feature of Tokyo Disneyland’s Tomorrowland. Opened 1989, I’m assuming the design was finalized when the then-new Star Tours was at the height of its popularity in California and the Tokyo design was adjusted to treat this as a huge E-ticket with space for the accompanying crowds. While the Tokyo version of the ride itself is identical to the other versions, everything else about it just seems to have a grander scope, beyond the usual Tokyo-plussing. For example, the queue features an additional room before the familiar C3PO-droid room-loading room set-up: the huge hangar area pictured here. While only a single room, it has a scale and grandeur not showcased in other versions of this attraction, really helping to drive home that you are in some sort of space hangar. The queue also features many more random droids and animtronic figures, feeling more lively and “lived-in” than any other version I’ve been to.
When I was visiting, Tokyo’s Star Tours was still operating as the original version and not the revamped version that recently opened in California and Florida. It was cool to see the original one last time and to hear Rex speaking Japanese. Tokyo Disneyland is currently in the process of converting the ride to the newer version.
I know this gets said fairly often about Tokyo’s attractions, but it’s especially true here: Tokyo Disneyland’s Star Tours is the definitive version of the attraction, without question. It will never impress or delight you more than it will in Tokyo.
Twitter: photojames
Instagram: jdhilger

Starspeeder Space Hangar on Flickr.

Tomorrowland
Tokyo Disneyland


This week: The Tokyo of Tomorrow(land)

As I’ve mentioned before, Star Tours is a big feature of Tokyo Disneyland’s Tomorrowland. Opened 1989, I’m assuming the design was finalized when the then-new Star Tours was at the height of its popularity in California and the Tokyo design was adjusted to treat this as a huge E-ticket with space for the accompanying crowds. While the Tokyo version of the ride itself is identical to the other versions, everything else about it just seems to have a grander scope, beyond the usual Tokyo-plussing. For example, the queue features an additional room before the familiar C3PO-droid room-loading room set-up: the huge hangar area pictured here. While only a single room, it has a scale and grandeur not showcased in other versions of this attraction, really helping to drive home that you are in some sort of space hangar. The queue also features many more random droids and animtronic figures, feeling more lively and “lived-in” than any other version I’ve been to.

When I was visiting, Tokyo’s Star Tours was still operating as the original version and not the revamped version that recently opened in California and Florida. It was cool to see the original one last time and to hear Rex speaking Japanese. Tokyo Disneyland is currently in the process of converting the ride to the newer version.

I know this gets said fairly often about Tokyo’s attractions, but it’s especially true here: Tokyo Disneyland’s Star Tours is the definitive version of the attraction, without question. It will never impress or delight you more than it will in Tokyo.

Twitter: photojames
Instagram: jdhilger

Star Tours Hangar on Flickr.Tomorrowland
Tokyo Disneyland
Tomorrowland has a unique feel in Tokyo Disneyland. It feels a lot like a 1980s Tomorrowland that was never refurbed but instead just constantly plussed. None of the neon alley feel of the Magic Kingdom nor the failed retro future of Disneyland in Anaheim. Tomorrowland in Tokyo is also a lot more vertical, often placing you on the 2nd story of buildings, which is something not seen as much in the American parks. High-res

Star Tours Hangar on Flickr.

Tomorrowland
Tokyo Disneyland


Tomorrowland has a unique feel in Tokyo Disneyland. It feels a lot like a 1980s Tomorrowland that was never refurbed but instead just constantly plussed. None of the neon alley feel of the Magic Kingdom nor the failed retro future of Disneyland in Anaheim. Tomorrowland in Tokyo is also a lot more vertical, often placing you on the 2nd story of buildings, which is something not seen as much in the American parks.

The Adidas Star Wars 2010 sneaker line. Brilliant. Some of these are just too gimmicky, but a surprising amount are subtle enough to be completely wearable without feeling like it’s Halloween. I know which ones I like but I’m not telling. My taste doesn’t typically involve the whole “sneaker-scene”, so the fact that I’m on board should say something.

They really should have got these out in time for Christmas: they would have made a mint.